21 results
August 28, 2015

The Catechism of the Catholic Church tells us, in paragraph 2051, that apart from the teaching authority of the Church, it is impossible to maintain the “saving truths of the faith:”

The infallibility of the Magisterium of the Pastors extends to all the elements of doctrine, including moral doctrine, without which the saving truths of the faith cannot be preserved, expounded, or observed.

Too many Catholics take for granted the great gift of the...

August 17, 2015

I wouldn’t be surprised if there were a new pope a year from now. I’m not making a prediction—my prognosticational abilities are not sufficiently developed. I’m just bringing up a possibility, one that I think isn’t farfetched.

Let me begin by turning back the calendar a few pages, to 1292. Pope Nicholas IV, who had been reigning since 1288, died that April. He had been elected only after a long impasse among the papal electors. As it turned out, his successor was elected after an...

November 12, 2014
Jeremy Irons, as Alexander VI, "The Borgias"

Not long after John Paul II died, I received an apologetics question from someone who was corresponding with a hard-core Traditionalist—"probably SSPX" was how the Traditionalist was described to me. My inquirer reported that his correspondent believed John Paul II was "the worst pope ever," but let's allow the Traditionalist to put into his own words his position on the man who has since been canonized, and is now known to the world as St. John Paul II:

John Paul II didn'...

July 17, 2014

Over the years I have had my fair share of encounters with anti-Catholics. Their arguments against the faith are pretty predictable - one of the most popular being that the Pope is the Antichrist. One of the typical “gotcha” proofs of this claim is the Papal symbol of the upside down or inverted cross, which the anti-Catholic confidently asserts as being satanic. Because of this, they reason, the Pope is himself in league with Satan.

The truth of the matter is that the upside down...

April 29, 2014

In the pantheon of great women in Church history, pride of place should be accorded the young mystic from Siena, St. Catherine, whose feast we celebrate today.

Born in 1347 to a humble wool-dyer, Catherine became one the most influential persons of fourteenth-century Christendom. After she became a Dominican tertiary at the age of nineteen she embarked on a life of intense spiritual practices. Her reputation for great holiness spread quickly, and she found herself answering letters...