59 results
October 27, 2016
The Burning of Jerusalem by Nebuchadnezzar’s Army by Juan de la Corte

"The Jews never accepted the Deuterocanon [Apocrypha]." You'll hear this in conversations with Protestants and read it on virtually every Protestant website that defends the Protestant Old Testament canon. But is it true?

One could appeal to New Testament evidence that Jesus, the apostles, and the inspired authors of the New Testament did indeed accept the Deuterocanon as Scripture. But what about extrabiblical evidence? Does any exist?

One of the earliest pieces of evidence...

October 11, 2016
A 1925 illustration published by the Pillar of Fire Church in Zarephath, NJ.

In 2014 the U.S. Supreme Court ruled in Burwell v. Hobby Lobby Stores, Inc. that some businesses were exempt from the Affordable Care Act contraception mandate if they had a religious objection to it. After the decision was released, Ronald Lindsay, an advocate for atheism and author of the book The Necessity of Secularism, penned an online essay...

September 16, 2016
St. Robert Bellarmine

Events in history happen in certain times and places. Goes without saying, right? I’m not so sure. It’s not uncommon for us to examine the past through the lenses of today.

I once read a history of the eleventh-century Norman conquest of Sicily. This otherwise lively and accurate account portrayed Robert Guiscard and Roger de Hauteville as venture capitalists, a profession that no medieval man could have wrapped his imagination around.

It is a mistake to judge the decisions and...

September 12, 2016
Jan Sobieski depicted in "The Relief of Vienna" by Marcello Bacciarelli

Today (September 12) is the memorial of the Most Holy Name of Mary, a liturgical celebration that probably gives many Catholics pause. Honoring the Blessed Mother in the liturgy is nothing new or unique in the Church, but many may ask, why this feast on this day?

The answer lies in a pivotal battle fought in the late seventeenth century between the Cross and the Crescent at the “Gateway to Europe.” A little more than a hundred years after ...

March 21, 2016
The Resurrection of Christ by Paolo Veronese, c. 1570

Many skeptics assert that the early Christians believed in miracles because theirs was a primitive, prescientific culture where people were ignorant of the course of nature. As such, it is argued, they were not able to perceive a miracle as being contrary to nature and thus readily accepted miracle claims.

For instance, in his work An Enquiry Concerning Human Understanding, eighteenth-century Scottish skeptic philosopher David Hume argues for a...