34 results
November 30, 2013

Few texts have been the occasion for the spilling of more ink than Matthew 16:17-19: 

And Jesus answered him, "Blessed are you, Simon Bar-Jona! For flesh and blood has not revealed this to you, but my Father who is in heaven. And I tell you, you are Peter, and upon this rock I will build my church, and the powers of death shall not prevail against it. I will give you the keys of the kingdom of heaven, and whatever you bind on earth shall be bound in heaven,...

November 12, 2013

My friend Dennis Barton lives near Liverpool, England, and operates an apostolate called The Church in History Information Centre. Over the last several decades he has defended the Church from many erroneous historical claims. He also has had an interest in scriptural disputes.

Dennis became friends with the late Bernard Orchard, OSB, one of the twentieth century's top biblical scholars. One of Orchard's lasting interests was the Synoptic Problem: What is the literary relationship...

October 29, 2013

If you read magisterial documents written in the last fifty years, you’ll occasionally run across a statement that talks about man being revealed to himself.

Sometimes, the statement will say that God reveals man to himself.

Other times, it will say that Christ reveals man to himself.

What do these statements mean?

Two types of revelation

We’re familiar with the idea of divine revelation—that God discloses or reveals certain things to us....

October 28, 2013

A couple of years ago, I attended a Bible study class on the Book of Ruth at a local synagogue. I was interested in learning more about Scripture from a Jewish perspective. One aspect of the class that fascinated me was that the rabbi leading the class focused the class's attention on small details of the text on which I never would have thought to focus. For example, what was the significance of Elimelech and his family choosing to leave Bethlehem during its time of trial (...

October 5, 2013

“Have you been born again, my friend?” Thousands of Catholics have been asked this question by well-meaning Fundamentalists or Evangelicals. Of course, by “born again” the Protestant usually means: “Have you accepted Jesus Christ as your personal Lord and Savior through the recitation of ‘the sinner’s prayer?”” How is a Catholic to respond?

The simple Catholic response is: “Yes, I have been born again—when I was baptized.” In...