9 results
November 16, 2016
Early ecumenical council

In this part of our series on sola scriptura, I want to look at what the earliest Christians living in the decades and centuries immediately following the apostles can teach us about the practice of the Church at that time.

After coming to the conclusion that the New Testament did not teach sola scriptura, the next question for me was: what about the early Church?

How did those closest to the apostolic age think about the relationship between Scripture,...

October 28, 2016

Where exactly does the New Testament teach that the Bible is to function in the Christian’s life and in the life of the Church as the “sole infallible rule of faith and practice”?

Where does it say or imply that the teaching of Scripture is so clear that no authority on Earth would be needed to determine and preserve authentic Christian doctrine—you know, so that individual believers aren’t reading their Bibles and running off in all directions and starting independent churches and...

October 7, 2016
Paul Writing His Epistles by Valentin de Boulogne (17th century)

We saw in Part I that while the apostles were still on the earth, Christians had the benefit of a living magisterium.

In Part II we asked the question: are there hints in the writings of the apostles that indicate they understood that after they died,...

September 19, 2016
The twelve apostles

We’ve seen that the rule of faith and practice for those Christians living during the time of the apostles was not sola scriptura

For them authority resided in the inspired Scripture, the oral teaching of the apostles, and the Church’s leadership as it met in council to settle disputed matters (Acts 15).

Now, someone...

August 29, 2016
A house in Fillmore slid off its foundation in the 1994 Northridge earthquake,

One the great church historians of the nineteenth century, German Lutheran scholar Adolf Harnack, bemoaned the ignorance his mainly Lutheran university students displayed of Catholicism:

I am convinced from constant experience of the fact that the students who leave our schools have the most disconnected and absurd ideas about ecclesiastical history. Some of them know something about Gnosticism, or about other curious and for them worthless details. But of...